Archive for the ‘Grand’ Category

A Farewell to Geopolitics

Stephen Van Evera. in Melvyn P Leffler and Jeffrey W Legro, To Lead the World: American Strategy after the Bush Doctrine, Oxford Press, 2008. Hosted on the Commonwealth Institute website.
http://www.comw.org/pda/fulltext/vanevera-farewell-to-geopolitics.pdf

America’s Liberal Illiberalism: The Ideological Origins of Overreaction in U.S. Foreign Policy

Michael C. Desch. International Security, Winter 2007/2008.
http://defensealt.org/HeoJur

The Case for Restraint

Barry Posen. The American Interest online, Nov-Dec 2007.
http://www.the-american-interest.com/article.cfm?piece=331

Excerpt:

Iraq should therefore be seen not as a singular debacle, but as a harbinger of costs to come. There is enough capacity and motivation out in the world to increase significantly the costs of any U.S. effort to manage global politics directly. Public support for this policy may wane before profligacy so diminishes U.S. power that it becomes unsustainable.

A Balanced Foreign Policy

Daryl Press and Benjamin Valentino. from How to Make America Safe: New Policies for National Security, The Tobin Project, 2006.
http://www.tobinproject.org/downloads/NS_Balanced_Foreign_Policy.pdf

Excerpt:

… America’s current foreign policy relies too heavily on military force to promote U.S. interests. Although military force is sometimes necessary, U.S. policy should be balanced and rely more on America’s other tools of foreign policy—e.g., our unrivaled economy, and the global appeal of our values. Through a balanced foreign policy, the United States can achieve its important foreign policy goals, while reestablishing our country as a beacon of freedom and human rights, at
a fraction of the costs of the current policy.

American Foreign Policy for the New Era

Steve Van Evera. from How to Make America Safe: New Policies for National Security, The Tobin Project, 2006.
http://www.tobinproject.org/downloads/NS_American_Foreign_Policy_For_New_Era.pdf

Excerpt:

The world’s major powers should organize themselves into a new concert—along lines of the 1815 Concert of Europe—to take united action against WMD proliferation, terrorism, and threats to the global commons. The U.S. should lead in creating and sustaining this new concert.